Wednesday, April 14, 2010

Music 105 - Jazz Appreciation Listening Assignment

Hi all -

If you are a student in my Jazz Appreciation course at CSU Bakersfield - you are in the right place. For your furlough assignment I want you to listen to and watch to the following song on YouTube:


This composition was recorded by Jelly Roll Morton in 1926 and is a wonderful example of New Orleans Jazz and a good representation of Jelly Roll Morton as an arranger.

Additionally, read my sample Listening Based Writing Assignment that talks about this piece, found here:


After you have dealt with the video and read the paper, I want you to watch the following video and write two paragraphs about what you see/hear. Use my sample paper as a guide about content and language usages. If you are unsure about how to use a word - look it up. Don't guess.


Great tune - really talk about the soloing and the musical characteristics you hear. Try to grapple with the music as much as possible.

This 2 paragraph assignment (no less than six good sentences per paragraph) is due by Monday, April 19 by 5 PM PDT. Please just post your paragraphs as comments in this blog post.

Be sure to include your full name to receive credit.

44 comments:

TheChad1991 said...

Shady Alame
Music 105

Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five recorded the song "Hotter Than That" in Chiago in December 13, 1927. The song begins with the entire band playing a melody for the first ten seconds. After the ten seconds, Louis Armstrong comes in with his cornet solo. Like the rest of Armstrong's work, his solo sounded very improvised. He continues his solo with his wife Lil Armstrong on the piano playing the rhythm until around 1:20 of the song where Armstrong begins scat singing. As he is scat singing, you can hear a good deal of Johnny St. Cyr on the banjo.

At about 2 minutes into the song, Armstrong is scat singing in call and response with the banjo player. This continues until about 2:14 until the piano takes it away with a quick 4 second transition in which the trombone takes a solo. Trombone player Fred Robinson plays a solo until around 2:35. At the 2:35 mark, Armstrong comes in again with his cornet and the entire band follows. As the band is playing, Armstrong's loud playing grabs most of the attention. At 2:52 the banjo comes in again with a quick transition followed by Armstrong again on the cornet. They then end the song at about 3 minutes. You could definetly hear the improvisation throughtout the song, which was a pretty catchy, foot-tapping song.

etejada7 said...

Eileen Tejada
Music 105
Furlough Assignment

Louis Armstrong was the leader of a band called the “Hot Five”. Armstrong and his band were unlike other bands of their time; they only recorded their music in the studio and did not go on tour with each other. Despite this they were very successful as a whole and made many great recordings such as the one I will be examining today, called “Hotter than that” which was recorded in 1927. “Hotter than that” starts off with a syncopated melody between Armstrong and his band, until the ten second mark where Armstrong plays his cornet as a solo, which is one of his signatures. During his solo you can hear his wife Lil Armstrong keeping the melody in the background.

Armstrong’s solo sounds very improvised, while still staying with the melody. At 1 min 20 second mark, Armstrong starts to bee bop, which is another one of his signatures during his songs. The melody is consistent while he is doing this, showing off the bands talents of being able to collectively improvise. They are also showing off a call-and-response to the sound of his voice. At the two minute fifteen second mark, the melody has a significant change leading into the trumpet solo, and at two thirty-five Armstrong takes over for a second solo. Near the ending of the song the improvisation gains greater range and makes the song sound very hip, interesting and fun.

missyncharge said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
missyncharge said...

April Etheridge
Music 105
Furlough Assignment
Louis Armstrong formed a band called the “Hot Fives.” Armstrong chooses all the musicians that he wanted to play in his band. They recorded their music in a studio, and the record company let Armstrong express his idea on how he wanted the music to sound. The “Hot Five” were very good and created wonderful music. On December of 1927, the “Hot Five” recorded a hit song called “Hotter Than That.” The beginning of the song starts with a syncopated melody played by the band for the first ten seconds. Armstrong then begins his solo on the cornet. His solo is a great example of developing a melodic statement. While Armstrong is playing his solo, Lil Armstrong his wife joins him playing the piano.

The rhythm played until the 1:20 mark. Armstrong begins to scat sing. While Armstrong is scat singing the band still continues to play which shows collective improvisation. 2 minutes into the scat singing there is a call and response between Armstrong’s voice and the banjo player. After the call and response the piano starts playing for a moment, and is taken over by the trombone solo. At around 2: 35 Armstrong is on again playing the cornet over powering the rest of the band but still sounding improvised. The song is well improvised and is an enjoyment to the ears.

Hananapancakes said...

Listening Based Writing Assignment #1

Hannah Clark
Music 105-Jazz Appreciation
April 15, 2010

Louis Armstrong was without a doubt the virtuoso cornet player of the times. Even now, concerts and musical events are hosted in appreciation for his lively music and incredible life. Armstrong began recording with his group, the Hot Five, in the mid 1920’s. A superb example of his creative approach toward music and his ability to inject such soulful improvisation into his sound is “Hotter Than That” by Armstrong himself and his Hot Five.

“Hotter Than That” is an uppity collaboration of instruments that features a cornet, trombone, clarinet, piano, banjo and drums. These instruments accompanied by the vocals of Louis Armstrong call for a very hip tune. It begins with an eight bar intro with the first minute and nineteen seconds of musical composition mostly showcasing the talents of Louis Armstrong on the cornet, while the piano, banjo and drums in the background keep the rhythm and tempo steady. From one minute and twenty seconds to two minutes and thirteen seconds, Louis Armstrong adds his vocals in a highly creative improvised scat form. Continuing with his exciting tone and fun mix of high and low toned scatting; Armstrong’s vocals and the banjo begin a few moments of call and response. This occurs between the one minute and fifty-nine second mark until two minute and fourteen second mark.

The call and response is slow and simple but incredibly soulful. At the two minute and fifteen second mark, the piano has a very short, hard solo of only four seconds until it introduces a large section of collective improvisation. This continues in an even more lively form until the very last few seconds when nearly all instruments involved get one last mini solo each. This gives a fun, fresh sense of closure to such an artistically musical tune.

naomi said...

Naomi Conjurski

Louis Armstrong was the leader of a New Orleans jazz style band called the Hot Fives. Armstrong’s “Hot Fives” were lead by Armstrong himself playing the cornet and showcasing his vocals and specifically consisted of: Kid Ory with his trombone, Johnny Dodds on clarinet, Armstrong’s wife Lil Hardin playing piano, Lonnie Johnson on guitar, and Johnny St. Cyr playing banjo. Louis Armstrong and his “Hot Fives” recordings have been quoted as “fundamental documents in the history of American music” because they were monumental in changing the way jazz and blues music has evolved up until today.
Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five recorded the song “Hotter than That” in Chicago, Illinois on December 13, 1927. This song exemplifies the true virtuosity and genius talent of not only Louis Armstrong and his leadership skills, but the band’s ability to combine their talents and collectively improvise as a whole. The song begins initially with the entire ensemble playing in unison with Louis Armstrong leading on cornet. This introduction goes on for eight bars (about ten seconds) and transitions into Armstrong himself solo improvising on cornet for an addition minute and ten seconds with Lil Hardin playing the piano melody while keeping rhythm in the background. Subsequently, Armstrong begins improvising with his scat singing and Lil Hardin still maintaining rhythm on piano in the background. Slight hints of Johnny St. Cyr on the banjo can also be heard at this point in time.
Just under two minutes into the song, Louis Armstrong begins call-and-response scatting with the banjo player Johnny St. Cyr. After about fifteen seconds of Armstrong and Cyr calling and responding to each other, Lil Hardin on piano transitions into a trombone solo by Kid Ory for another fifteen seconds. Afterwards, Louis Armstrong comes back to lead on cornet and more energetic than ever with rapid high notes and lots of range. The remainder of the ensemble can be heard collectively improvising in the background. The song concludes with a coda, which is two bars of solo guitar, followed by a couple bars of the trumpet, and then finishes with another two bars of solo guitar. This energetic song truly showcases the talents of all the band members involved and gives a whole new perspective on the quintessence of what Louis Armstrong’s “Hot Five” ensemble of jazz and blues became in the 1920’s.

sagar said...

Sagar Patel
Music 105
Furlough Day Assignment

Louis Armstrong and his band the Hot Five were famous in their day and still are. Louis Armstrong and the Hot Five composed over twenty jazz pieces. Each band member that played in the Hot Five was hand picked by Louis Armstrong. Louis Armstrong was a virtuoso at playing the cornet. Any mistakes that Louis Armstrong would make would sound like as if it was apart of the piece, because it was just how great he was. "Hotter Than That" by Louis Armstrong and the Hot Five was composed in 1927 was a famous jazz piece that I will be writing about.

Hotter Than That starts off with the whole band playing together. After about nine to ten seconds into the song, Louis Armstrong starts his solo with the cornet until about the 1:20 mark with Lil-Harden Armstrong on the piano. Louis Armstrong then begins to scat sing. While he is scat singing, he starts to do a call-in-response with the banjo. After Louis Armstrong's call-in-response is over, the whole band once again starts to play together. Towards the end of the song, the banjo and Louis Armstrong play together till the end of the song.

Dudeitsstephie said...

Estefania Limpias
Music 105
Furlough Assignment

Louis Armstrong and his band the Hot Five recorded a song called "Hotter Than That" in 1927. When you first begin to listen to the song it sounds very collective because it sounds life everyones playing. After a few seconds into the song Louis Armstrong comes in and performs a solo on the cornet. Armstron sounds very virtuos and is known to be one of the best performers. During his solo his wife Lil Armstrong is on the piano keeping the melody. During the solo it started to sound more like individualistic improvisation. Armstrong solo lasted till about 1:20.
After his solo Armstrong begins to sing and he keeps the melody with his voice. During his singing Armstrong begins to do a call and response with the banjo player. After the call and response the trombone begins his solo. after the trombone solo Armstrong comes in once again with a solo playing the cornet. Armstrong sounds so much more interesting then the banjo player. i felt that the whole song was very well improvised.

itsjustconch said...

Connie Ordonez
Music 105
Furlough Assignment #1

Louis Armstrong was a great rhythmic genius when it comes to singing scat and playing the cornet, a brass instrument similar to the trumpet. Armstrong was definitely a virtuosic cornet player of his time. He was very talented and this was revealed through his improvisation with a New Orleans style. A great example of his scat singing, virtuosity and improvisation in music is heard in the recording in December 1927 of “Hotter Than That” of Louis Armstrong, himself, along with his band the Hot Five.
In the tune, “Hotter Than That”, is consisted of Louis Armstrong on the trumpet and vocals, Kid Ory on the trombone, Johnny Dodds on the clarinet, Lil Hardin on the piano, Lonnie Johnsen on the guitar, and Johnny St. Cyr on the banjo. This piece is very textured (polyphonic) that does not have only one distinct melody but numerous melodies played by the instruments. In the beginning of this tune, all instruments are heard. Louis Armstrong’s solo on the trumpet is heard above all other instruments being played. Armstrong has a solo until the 0:45 mark and the clarinet is featured a solo until the 1:19 mark. As the solos are being played, the other instruments are being played in the background on certain beats as it would be in a stop-time. At the 1:19 mark, Louis Armstrong begins the scat singing accompanied by the banjo and the guitar until about the 2:12 mark and the whole band plays all together in a stop-time manner with a trombone solo until Armstrong comes along again, which over powers the other instruments like in the beginning, with the solo around the 2:33 time mark till the end of the song. “Hotter Than That” is a very well improvised piece that features the virtuosity and the remarkable scat singing of Louis Armstrong.

John Gonzalez said...

Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five took the world head over heels with their entertaining and inspiring instrumental music. Like the song “Hotter Than That,” which starts off with the whole band playing a small, but very melodic intro that ends near the 0:09 mark then leading to an improvisatory of Louis Armstrong in the cornet. During Armstrong’s improvisatory the band in the back ground is playing straight eighth notes while he plays a more syncopated rhythm, and then around the 0:26 mark the band pauses leaving Armstrong playing by himself. Armstrong’s plays a fairly wide range until about the 0:44 mark were Armstrong hands the improvised melody to the clarinet.
Clarinet too plays a syncopated rhythm than the straight eighth notes played by the band and covers a very wide range, then about the 1:01 mark the band pauses leaving the clarinet solo. The clarinet then led the band back in by bending a note at the 1:03 mark. At about 1:19 mark the clarinet passes the improvised melody to Armstrong again were he doesn’t solo in his trumpet, but instead uses the form “scat” which is a way of singing an instruments part in way it sounds like gibberish. At around the 1:59 mark Armstrong and the guitar start using call and response. Were Armstrong scats something and the guitar responses the same way. At the mark 2:18 the piano introduces the trombone who will begin the melody again. Then at the mark 2:35 Armstrong regains the melody, but it is not the same as the way he played it in the beginning then Armstrong and the guitar have a brief call and response ending the song with the guitar playing a chord. Armstrong and his Hot five play a 12 bar-blues form, however, it is extended to 16 measures.

rpatel21 said...

Rajan Patel
Music 105
Furlough Assignment #1

Louis Armstrong and his band the hot five made some of the greatest recordings in jazz history. One of which was his biggest hit, Hotter Than That. This song started collective because it sounded like the whole band was playing. Later in the song he performs a solo with his cornet. One thing that is very interesting is that Armstrong’s wife is keeping the melody on the piano when he is performing the solo. His solo sounded like an individualistic improvisation.

After his solo, Armstrong performed a call and response with the banjo player. This was when Armstrong sounded like a virtuoso. After he performs the call and response, then the trombone player starts his solo. Then Armstrong comes back in with the whole band start to play once again. One other cool thing that he does is scat sing after his solo. Lastly, the banjo player and Louis Armstrong conclude the song.

Markki said...

Markki R. Ramos
Mus. 105

Louis Armstrong and the Hot Five recorded the song “Hotter Than That” in Chicago on December 13, 1927. Armstrong and his band only recorded music in a studio. They didn’t go on tour as a group. The song included a clarinet, some trumpets, a banjo,a trombone, and a piano, from what I heard. The first ten seconds of the song is a melody that Armstrong plays with his group. After the melody, Armstrong has a solo part. His solo sounds improvised and is a very strong. While Armstrong is playing his solo, his wife Lillian Armstrong comes in with the piano.
After Armstrong does his solo, he starts to sing. And he soon has a call and response with the banjo player. While he and the banjo player are doing call and response, the rest of the band is still present. This call and response the Armstrong does, he does it in the form of scat singing. After Armstrong’s solo, there are a few smaller instrumental solos that follow up, but Armstrong quickly takes over once again. This piece seemed to show Armstrong and how he is developing with his instrument and the power it can bring.

Eshannon21 said...

Eric Shannon
Music 105

Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five really pull together an amazing work of art in their song, Hotter than that. Including Lonnie Johnson on guitar. This song was recorded in 1927 in Chicago Illinois. In this song, Armstrong truly shows his virtuosity both on cornet and vocals.
“Hotter Than That” starts with a dominant cornet playing the syncopated melody, while the clarinet is softer sounding and is also playing a syncopated melody. In the background in the other band members playing the rhythm portion on the song. 10 seconds in, the band keeps playing the rhythm and Armstrong playing the cornet keeps playing a highly syncopated melody. The rhythm is kept by Johnny St. Cyr who is playing the banjo. At the 25 second mark, there is a solo break that Armstrong fills in with his Cornet. On the 29 second mark, the members resume with the rhythm and syncopated melodies. 44 Seconds in, Johnny Dodds plays takes over the melody and Armstrong stops playing and Dodds picks up right where he left off with a solo break followed by the normal rhythm Armstrong was playing with. At 1:01 Dodds take another solo break, then returns to accompaniment by the banjo and piano. 1:20 into the song, Armstrong uses his vocals during a solo break. Further accompanied after the solo break by the banjo and guitar. 1:56 Armstrong keeps scatting for a solo and then a genius call and response between Armstrong's' vocals and Lonnie Johnson's guitar. This call and response is not accompanied by any other instruments. The tempo slows down for a dramatic slow paced call and response. 2:15 the piano gets a small solo after the call and response is over then joined in by the trombone and banjo. To resume the rhythm and melody just like the beginning stages of the song. At 2:34 a solo break occurs again with Armstrong and his cornet followed by the rhythm joining back in. Everyone is playing now with a polyphonic melody and highly syncopated play. 2:45, Armstrong is playing the cornet while the rhythm section is playing only on certain notes, also known as stop time. 2:52 Johnson get a solo with his guitar, followed by another call and response from Armstrong's cornet.

deonika.mcdaniel said...

Deonika McDaniel
Music Appr. 105

Louis Armstrong was the leader of a group called His Hot Five. His Hot Five was a very popular band in the 1920’s. They did not go on tours and do concerts like other groups during their time they mostly composed and recorded music in the studio. They composed many great songs during their time including “Hotter Than That” a piece composed in 1927. At the beginning of “Hotter Than That” a 16 bar piece the entire band is for a short moment. Then Armstrong improvised, while the band is still behind him.
The band stops playing and Armstrong continues improvising without them. Then Armstrong pauses and the clarinet player starts to play and the band joins bank in for a while playing for about eight bars. Then the clarinet has a solo for a moment, and then the band joins back in. the band and clarinet stops, and Armstrong begins to scat. Then Armstrong and the banjo start a call and responds for a while. After a little while the piano and another instrument began a melody, which ends the song.

chuerta1 said...

Crystal Huerta
Music 105
Furlough Assignment

Louis Armstrong was known as a virtuoso cornet player. He composed his band “The Hot Five” around the 1920’s, which was a typical New Orleans Jazz band in instrumentation, consisting of a trumpet, clarinet, and trombone backed by a rhythm section. All of the band’s records were made in Chicago, Illinois in their recording studio. Armstrong and his “Hot Fives” recordings have changed the way jazz and blues music has engaged today. Louis Armstrong and his band were very successful, one of their recordings that I will be examining is called “Hotter than that”. “Hotter than that” was recorded December 13, 1927 in Chicago. In this recording, Louis is the cornet player, Fred Robinson is the trombone player, Johnny Dodds is the clarinet player, Lil Hardin is the piano player, Lonnie Johnson is the guitar player, and Johnny ST. Cyr is the banjo. The song begins with the entire band playing a melody for the first fifteen seconds.
After the entire band stops playing, Louis Armstrong takes his place with his cornet solo. While Armstrong is playing you can also hear his wife Lil Armstrong in the background of the cornet. At 1:20 Armstrong begins to Scat Sing with the band as well. Armstrong takes a break at about 1:55-1:58, which introduces Lonnie Johnson with his 16 bar interlude of guitar. Louis Johnson plays the guitar at 2:00 into the record. The second chorus ends with a clarinet break for about 43-45 seconds meaning that Louis chorus is 30 bars followed by Johnny Dodds with his clarinet in the break. At about 2:14-2:17 Lil Armstrong sings. At about 2:18-2:52 the trombone is played with its 14 bars with Armstrong 2 bar break. At about three minutes into the song, the piece ends with a coda 2 bar solo guitar and a couple of trumpet playing.

chuerta1 said...

Crystal Huerta
Music 105
Furlough Assignment

Louis Armstrong was known as a virtuoso cornet player. He composed his band “The Hot Five” around the 1920’s, which was a typical New Orleans Jazz band in instrumentation, consisting of a trumpet, clarinet, and trombone backed by a rhythm section. All of the band’s records were made in Chicago, Illinois in their recording studio. Armstrong and his “Hot Fives” recordings have changed the way jazz and blues music has engaged today. Louis Armstrong and his band were very successful, one of their recordings that I will be examining is called “Hotter than that”. “Hotter than that” was recorded December 13, 1927 in Chicago. In this recording, Louis is the cornet player, Fred Robinson is the trombone player, Johnny Dodds is the clarinet player, Lil Hardin is the piano player, Lonnie Johnson is the guitar player, and Johnny ST. Cyr is the banjo. The song begins with the entire band playing a melody for the first fifteen seconds.
After the entire band stops playing, Louis Armstrong takes his place with his cornet solo. While Armstrong is playing you can also hear his wife Lil Armstrong in the background of the cornet. At 1:20 Armstrong begins to Scat Sing with the band as well. Armstrong takes a break at about 1:55-1:58, which introduces Lonnie Johnson with his 16 bar interlude of guitar. Louis Johnson plays the guitar at 2:00 into the record. The second chorus ends with a clarinet break for about 43-45 seconds meaning that Louis chorus is 30 bars followed by Johnny Dodds with his clarinet in the break. At about 2:14-2:17 Lil Armstrong sings. At about 2:18-2:52 the trombone is played with its 14 bars with Armstrong 2 bar break. At about three minutes into the song, the piece ends with a coda 2 bar solo guitar and a couple of trumpet playing.

chuerta1 said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
chuerta1 said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
JDSP said...

John-David S. Pomales
Music 105
19 April, 2010



Louis Armstrong recorded "Hotter Than that" with his band, The Hot Five on December 13, 1927. The song opens with thick texture because the whole band is playing. At the 10 second mark, Armstrong plays a solo on the cornet with Johnny St. Cyr accompanying him on banjo while keeping the tempo. Armstrong's solo has a large range that he ties in with his own version of the melody. At the 44 second mark clarinetist Johnny Dodds takes over. Dodds improvs with a large range in his solo with more vibrato than Armstrong in this piece. His range is mostly in the higher range sneaking in some notes in the middle range, but none the less entertaining.

As the song progresses, at about the 1:20 mark, Armstrong scats a solo with syncopation. Guitarist Lonnie Johnson accompanies him and participates in call and response with Armstrong's scatting solo at 2 min mark. At the 2:15 mark pianist Lil Armstrong accompanies trombonist Kid Ory while Cyr keeps the tempo. Ory's solo never leaves the middle range. Louis Armstrong improvs another solo at 2:36 mark in the high range with a thick texture because all instruments are playing with their own solos, yet accompanying Louis Armstrong at the same time. At 2:52 Johnson plays a small and last solo with Armstrong participating in call and response with him, progressing to Johnson finishing the song.

mysticxfaeryx said...

Lauren Dillard
Music 105

Louis Armstrong was a phenomenal cornet player as well as a scat singer. He was a great influence on Jazz throughout history and is still recognized today. He was the virtuoso of playing the cornet and improvising. Louis Armstrong created a Jazz band called the “Hot Five.” His “Hot Five” never toured but recorded music in studios. The band consisted of Kid Ory, Johnny Dodds, Johnny Cyr, and his wife Lil Hardin Armstrong. They played the piano, clarinet, trombone and banjo while Armstrong played the lead cornet.

In the song “Hotter than That,” Armstrong reveals his virtuosic ability accompanied by the rest of the band. The first 9 seconds of the song is composed of syncopation by the band. After the syncopation, Louis Armstrong solos playing his cornet with a melody while the banjo and piano are maintaining the rhythm. After the improvising on his cornet, around 1:20 he begins to scat while the banjo upholds the rhythm until 1:56. Louis Armstrong creates a Call-and-Response with his scatting then his banjo replies until 2:14. The piano starts the rhythm and then Armstrong continues with his cornet solo. At 2:45 there is a stop time then all of the instruments create their own melodies. This song ends with a Call-and-Response between Armstrong and the banjo. This song is truly catchy and hip while showing the true talent and organization of Armstrong and his band.

Blanca said...

Blanca Martinez-Music 105

Louis Armstrong & His Hot Five's "Hotter Than That" is 16 measures per section. This piece begins without an introduction and is instead started off with collective improvisation. Suddenly the collective improvisation stops and then there is a solo with the trumpet, that reaches high and low notes. This trumpet solo then has a call-and-response duet with the clarinet.
Halfway into the song, Armstrong begins to scat in a solo, then suddenly the rhythm section stops, and he scats on his own. The piano comes back in to welcome the rhythm section. After a little while of collective improvisation, there is another trumpet solo. The piano utilizes stop time near the end of the piece. The rhythm section stops to finalize the piece and ends with a banjo playing six extra measures.

gmtz said...

Guillermina Martinez
Music 105

Hotter Than That, Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five, Chicago, December 13, 1927.



The ensemble takes the first eight bars of introduction, with Louis Armstrong in the lead. A chorus in this piece is 32 bars long, so this intro, sometimes referred to as a vamp, is a quarter the length of a typical chorus. (Chorus is 09 – 45.) The vamp is followed by the first chorus, which consists of Louis Armstrong’s cornet solo accompanied by the rhythm section, with a break in bars 15-16 (at seconds 25-26). The rhythm section is distinguished from the front line, which is the second of the two parts to the Chicago jazz band. The front line consists of the cornet (later the trumpet), the trombone, the clarinet. As we know, the trumpet (or cornet) usually takes the melody as the trombone and clarinet fill in, but each of these instruments may take a solo each takes a solo in this recording while the others fill in. This chorus ends with a clarinet break (seconds 43-45), meaning that Louis' chorus is 30 bars followed by 2 taken by Johnny Dodd’s in the break.


In a break the rest of the band cuts out for a few measures while the soloist takes a particularly striking few bars by himself to be then re-joined by the ensemble. A break is a way for a soloist to demonstrate his prowess, and for a band to demonstrate how well they keep time together. In this recording they punctuate the middle and endings of the choruses. The second chorus (again at 32 bars long), opens with the final two bars of the first chorus taken by a Johnny Dodd’s clarinet break leading into his clarinet solo with rhythm accompaniment. Armstrong starts scat singing (1:19) it is the emotive, wordless singing in which the vocal more closely imitates an instrumental, since there are no words, only vocalizations. If at first this style of singing seems like mindless babble, listen more carefully. Armstrong’s singing style influenced every jazz singer after him, though few had his talent. Armstrong continues scatting to the end of the chorus with another break at 1:55 - 1:58, where he starts to imitate himself growling on a muted trumpet. This introduces a 16-bar interlude in which Louis engages the next soloist, Lonnie Johnson on the guitar, in a call and response duet. The piece ends with a coda: two bars of solo guitar, another couple of the trumpet and then a final two bars of solo guitar.

erickcharo said...

Erick Haro
Music 105
Furlough assignment

Lois Armstrong and His Hot Five had a hit with their song Hotter than That. This musical piece really shows the talents that Armstrong possesses. Throughout the piece the cornet, played by Armstrong, is moving up and down the musical scale hitting beautiful peaks of bright tones and as equally impressive low notes as well. Not to be left behind, Jimmy Strong executed wonderful playing as well on his clarinet. The two instruments flowed well together as if they were floating through the air together in a dance. The music played by these instruments was either very well written to complement one another or the improvisation was impeccable.
Speaking of improvisation, Armstrong also did a little scat singing through the middle to ¾ mark of the piece. His voice was emulating the cornet. Around the two minute mark the banjo performs a little of call and response against Armstrong’s scat singing. This song is timeless. The walking bass like foretells of the change in style from the “boom chick” feel of ragtime to the smooth much more hip bass line of swing. This song was the beginning of something great.

danzerbabe98 said...

Listening Based Writing Assignment #1





Karissa Martinez
Music 105- Jazz Appreciation
April 19, 2010





Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five performed and recorder their song “Hotter than That,” in December of 1927 with Okeh Records. Their piece, “Hotter Than That,” is one of the many examples of early jazz in the New Orleans area. Louis Armstrong himself was born in New Orleans 1901 and was mentored by another jazz legend known as Joesph “King” Oliver. In 1925 after Armstrong returned to New Orleans from his 3 years in Chicago, Armstrong formed his own jazz band known as Louis Armstrong and His Hot Fives.
“Hotter Than That” starts of syncopated for the first 10 seconds and after the cornet breaks into a solo for about the next 35 seconds while you can clearly hear the piano, drums and banjo in the background. After the cornet solo, the clarinet takes it away keeping up the tempo and playing lead while the piano, drums and banjo keep the rhythm going. Following the clarinet solo is a scatting vocal section where the background music practices stop-time with what sounds to be the banjo and the drums. During the end of the vocal scatting section, the vocalist and the banjo perform what can be explained as call and response. After this all of the instruments take over in a syncopated manor or otherwise known as collective improvisation which leads to another cornet solo with stop-time and last minute solos with the banjo and trombone.

Basestar2 said...

Brooke Andrade
Music 105
Furlough Assignment

Louis Armstrong is one of the greatest musicians of musical history. An idol to any artist he changed the techniques and styles for generations of people. Born in New Orleans he destined to live on through the era of jazz music. Beginning his musical abilities on cornet he eventually developed into member of the famous “Hot Five” then again into the legendary Louis Armstrong. The minds of America change after his performances that no one dared to try. Armstrong and his “Hot Five” demonstrate just how hot the are in “Hotter than That.”
In “Hotter than That,” the trumpet begins the melody with the rest of the band playing rhythmically. Armstrong demonstrates his ability to play off rhythm and sound astonishing, his famous trait. He shows how great of a virtuosic player he is. He also greatly provides listeners with a range of notes. At parts of the song the piano and banjo plays the role of all the rhythm section. Next Armstrong comes in with his solo vocals. He then switches back to the brass melody. He finishes off the trumpet and the banjo getting a few last notes in.

joegonzo1340 said...

Joseph Gonzalez
Music 105

The song starts off with what seems to be a solo performance from the cornet. The cornet stands out completely from everything else that is going on, which draws attention. By listening more closely, the other instruments are revealed. The second most noticeable instrument is the trombone, with its deep notes. Paying less attention to the cornet and trombone allows for the piano and clarinet to shine. The piano is keeping the tempo with its pattern-like beat. The clarinet adds more texture to the song with great energy and flow. This is all in the first nine seconds. After the first nine seconds, the cornet and piano break from the clarinet and trombone. The cornet play is syncopated, but with a logical pattern that can be followed. The piano keeps the rhythm, providing support to the cornet from the background. Near the forty-four second mark, the cornet ends with a fairly high note that can only be made by squeezing the lips insanely tight while playing. This final note from the cornet seems almost identical to the first note of the clarinet when it begins its phase in the song with the piano. The clarinet plays a similar melody, compared to the cornet. It is as if the cornet and the clarinet are complimenting each other, but within their solos. The clarinet and piano’s solo end before 1:20.

At around 1:20, Armstrong begins to scat sing with accompany of the guitar. Armstrong sings in the same pattern as the cornet and clarinet with the guitar complimenting his voice in the background. Stop time is used along with syncopation. Call and response occurs when Armstrong sings a set of notes and the guitar mimics. At around 2:14, the piano breaks from its silence and plays almost violently for 4-5 seconds. After this, the trombone jumps in for about 16 seconds of glory. The trombone plays a very melodic tune that follows the same structure of the song. This is the solo for the trombone, with a presence of the piano, taking away no attention. After this section of the song, play stops and the cornet jumps in with a rising pitch of play. The pitch of the cornet continues to rise until it hits a very high note. This note is repeated twelve times in pairs of two. After these twelve repeated notes, the cornet begins to play freely and syncopated. While the cornet is playing, the clarinet, trombone, and piano are all playing its pattern like play. The sound is very polyphonic until it settles down and taken over by the guitar. The guitar does call and response one more time with the cornet, until the guitar plays the final notes. The final notes are played softly and at a slow pace, until it dies off.

joegonzo1340 said...

Joseph Gonzalez
Music 105

The song starts off with what seems to be a solo performance from the cornet. The cornet stands out completely from everything else that is going on, which draws attention. By listening more closely, the other instruments are revealed. The second most noticeable instrument is the trombone, with its deep notes. Paying less attention to the cornet and trombone allows for the piano and clarinet to shine. The piano is keeping the tempo with its pattern-like beat. The clarinet adds more texture to the song with great energy and flow. This is all in the first nine seconds. After the first nine seconds, the cornet and piano break from the clarinet and trombone. The cornet play is syncopated, but with a logical pattern that can be followed. The piano keeps the rhythm, providing support to the cornet from the background. Near the forty-four second mark, the cornet ends with a fairly high note that can only be made by squeezing the lips insanely tight while playing. This final note from the cornet seems almost identical to the first note of the clarinet when it begins its phase in the song with the piano. The clarinet plays a similar melody, compared to the cornet. It is as if the cornet and the clarinet are complimenting each other, but within their solos. The clarinet and piano’s solo end before 1:20.


At around 1:20, Armstrong begins to scat sing with accompany of the guitar. Armstrong sings in the same pattern as the cornet and clarinet with the guitar complimenting his voice in the background. Stop time is used along with syncopation. Call and response occurs when Armstrong sings a set of notes and the guitar mimics. At around 2:14, the piano breaks from its silence and plays almost violently for 4-5 seconds. After this, the trombone jumps in for about 16 seconds of glory. The trombone plays a very melodic tune that follows the same structure of the song. This is the solo for the trombone, with a presence of the piano, taking away no attention. After this section of the song, play stops and the cornet jumps in with a rising pitch of play. The pitch of the cornet continues to rise until it hits a very high note. This note is repeated twelve times in pairs of two. After these twelve repeated notes, the cornet begins to play freely and syncopated. While the cornet is playing, the clarinet, trombone, and piano are all playing its pattern like play. The sound is very polyphonic until it settles down and taken over by the guitar. The guitar does call and response one more time with the cornet, until the guitar plays the final notes. The final notes are played softly and at a slow pace, until it dies off.

Jim Scully - aka jimmuscomp said...

Howdy

TStewart said...

Tucker Stewart
Music 105-Jazz Appreciation
Furlough Assignment


Louis Armstrong's band called Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five were apart of the New Orleans style jazz. Armstrong's band recorded the song "Hotter Than That". By the time of its recorded date (December 13, 1927) the New Orleans style jazz had already been "outlawed" in New Orleans and had moved to prodominently Chicago. The song begins with the typical New Orleans style with all the players playing on top of each other for the first ten seconds. At that time they begin the development of the melody in unison setting the stage for theme of the song. After the band ends (:10) Louis begins his cornet solo.

Armstrong's virtuoso nature takes over in his solo. His sound is very improvised but follows in time with the accompaniment of Lil Hardin (his wife) the piano player. Throughout his solo the rythmn is keep through the piano. His solo ends on cornet at 1:20 where his scat solo begins. Armstrongs' scat singing his accompanied by the banjo Johnny St. Cyr. Armstrong brings vast range in his scat singing while following a disjunct motion. At 1:56 begins his call and response with the banjo. At about 2:14 Lil Hardin moves the song to the trombone solo at 2:20 by Fred Robinson who plays until about 2:35. Armstrong begins on cornet again at 2:35 with the rest of the band but is prodimently heard. He plays with his highest range. At about 2:45-2:50 the band includes some sycnopation with the unexpected rests. The song ends with Louis on cornet and Johnny St. Cyr on banjo at 3:00. The song really emphasizes the New Orleans style jazz in the 20's.

yungdym3 said...

Corina Gutierrez
Furlough Assignment

Louis Armstrong was a man that was considered a virtuoso when it came to him and his cornet and he highly expresses this in the song “Hotter Than That,” in which he was accompanied by his group The Hot Fives. This 32 bar song starts off with the first ten seconds of the song expressing the widely range of syncopation and some improvising with the whole band and all the instruments: a cornet, a trombone, a clarinet, a piano, a banjo, and the drums. Quickly after this ten second syncopation and improvising of the band, Armstrong shows his imagination of music in a way no one else did by boldly playing his cornet for the first chorus, while at the same time the rhythm section keeps the rhythm going. Not only does Armstrong shine, but he also allows Johnny Dodds, the clarinet solo, to shine as well with the piano keeping the rhythm. At about 1:20, the unique scat singing of Louis Armstrong begins. Just like his cornet playing, Armstrong scat sings with full energy as if he were playing his instrument.

Sliding between pitches and making a bold sound out of his voice, Armstrong accomplishes this challenging scat voice section by the call and response of his voice to the playing of the banjo. Between the time frame of 2:14 and 2:16, the banjo ends this call and response with a few chords which jumps into the small solo of the piano leading into the few measures of the low and bold sound of the trombone solo which lasts 2:19-2:34. Once again the band is playing together with the sound of the cornet taking the lead, each with different timbres of sounds and each improvising. Towards 2:44-2:49 the band has its stop-time about three times, while Armstrong continues to play. Lastly, the banjo ends the song along with a couple descending notes from the cornet. With all the collective improvisation, syncopation, and solo breaks, Louis Armstrong and The Hot Fives were a successful jazz band and constantly kept people guessing on what they were going to hear next.

Yesica said...

Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five, "Hotter than that" starts out with upbeat melody from the cornet played by Armstrong. The harmony is composed by a banjo and the rhythm is played by the drums. The song features heavy improvisation throughout and has a melody that trades off between instruments. The intro lasts for about first 10 seconds of the songs after which it switches key. This phrase by the cornet lasts until 44 seconds where it is then taken over by a clarinet and also the piano comes in in the background.

At 1:20 Armstrong begins scat singing and takes over the melody. This lasts until 2 minutes where he begins a period of call and response with the banjo. A new phrase begins with a quick introduction by the piano and is then taken over by the trombone. At 2:35 the cornet returns and shares the melody with the trombone after which there is a quick call and response between the banjo and trombone which ends the song. This song shows Louis Armstrong’s genius as an artist as well as arranger.

Y. Dishman

Ulfhade said...

Kathleen Ojala
Music 105

The song “Hotter Than That” by Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five plays 32 bar sections with an ABAC pattern. The song starts off with the entire band playing together, with Armstrong’s powerful cornet playing clearly audible in the first section of the 32 bar music of section A. As the music moves along into the B section around (0:45), the first solo of Johnny Dodds on the clarinet is heard, with the piano and banjo providing accompaniment. The repeat of the A section is easily distinguished with Armstrongs scat singing at (1:20), and then moving into the third section, C, at around (1:56) with a call and response between Armstrong in the vocals and Lonnie Johnson on the guitar. This is followed by Armstrong back on the cornet playing with the rest of the band until the end of the piece.

There is a lot of improvisation that can be heard throughout the piece, most noticeably with Armstrong and Dodds. The syncopation of the cornet is particularly noticeable, although the other instruments such as the clarinet can be heard too. The trombones sliding tones are heard in the first section, as well as the last. The time of the piece is heard primarily through the banjo, with an emphasis on the second and fourth notes in a bar. During Armstrongs vocal solo, the guitar is the only accompanying instrument, allowing for the vocals to be heard loud and clearly. The music ends with the entire band playing together as in the beginning, and the final notes from the guitar.

Natalia said...

Natalia Obando
Music 105


Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five, "Hotter than that" starts out with upbeat
melody from the cornet played by Armstrong. The 32 bar song starts with the first ten seconds already expressing a wide range of syncopation and improvising with the whole band. I belive the instruments are:
drums, cornet, piano, trombone, clarinet, and a banjo.
After the 10 seconds the cornet and piano break from the clarinet
and trombone. The cornet play is syncopated, and follows a good pattern. The piano keeps the rhythm, providing support in the background. Around the forty-four second mark, the cornet ends with a fairly high note hich sounds very much like the same note the clarinet came in with the piano
near the beggining of the song. All the instruments compliment one another, the song was written well, and the improvisation was great.


Armstrong also added some scat singing through the middle of the piece.
Scat almost sounds like gibberish, immitating an instruments sound more or less,
the call and response was very interesting also.
At around 2:18 the trombone is introduced by the piano, followed by a solo
by Armstrong around 2:33 which completely overpowers all the intruments
as they keep rhythm and goes on until the end of the song.
The rhythm section stops to end the piece with a banjo plays six extra measures,
the organization of the band and the instruments made for a very catchy and classy
song. The piano improvisation really stood out for me, I really enjoyed
also how the entire band went in a full circle and joined up together
again to finalize the song.

Donald Yoakum said...

The tunes Hotter then That by Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five starts off making me want to dance. The tune portrays the boom chick idea, in which the left hand is playing the harmony and the right hand is playing the melody. There are multiple ranges in this piece. Throughout this whole piece the musicians seem to be playing both constant and dissonant sonorities, (more constant then dissonant). There are various solos in this tune in which one artist is able to take the lead and play for small portions of this tune. Louis Armstrong uses many different vocal ranges in his scatting solo; he also uses moans and whines while scatting. The scale and mode of this tune is major because it puts me in a happy mood due to the medium/ fast past tune. The Cadence from 1:56 – 2:15 is great in this tune, because it keeps a person guessing when the tune is going to pick up again. Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five also use cause and response during this time frame in the song while Louis is scatting. (1:56- 2:15).

The Texture of the song is homophonic because it is for the most part one distinct voice with accompaniment From 1:20-2:14 the song’s texture is homophonic. Before and after 1:20- 2:14, I would say that the tune’s texture is polyphonic. The stop time presented in the song starting at 2:46 until 2:49 is a great transition right before collective improvisation that leads to solo’s by the artists in the song that gives the song an interesting ending. The last stringing of the guitar or banjo or whatever the instrument being plucked at the very end of the tune is a great idea because it in my opinion brings a different element to the tune. The last plucking of the instrument of the tune gives the tune a tropic or island feeling. I would say that I like this tune because it represents many different ideas in a cleaver way. The tune wasn’t just a bunch of texture built up that wasn’t organized; this tune seemed to be well thought out or well improvised because there is an array of different instruments, and the solo sections seem to be done at the perfect time.

Breanna said...

Breanna Austin
Music appreciation 105

Louis Armstrong and the hot fives song “Hotter than that”, after the syncopated melody between Armstrong and the band Louis Armstrong begins playing the cornet as a solo piece. Once Louis is done with his solo you hear his wife Lil Armstrong playing the melody on the piano in the background of his cornet playing. Armstrong starts to scat sing along with his music and a call and response starts happening with the banjo. Armstrong became very famous for his ability to improvise on his cornet and create beautiful jazz music. Throughout the song goes from highs to lows while Armstrong is playing the cornet.

Armstrong and the Hot Fives did not do shows the simply only recorded in the recording studio. They did not travel on tours and became famous for their recordings. “Hotter than that was recorded in 1927 in Chicago. In this recording there are various solos with the cornet, banjo, piano and a few other I could not quit make out.

Marco F. said...

Marc Figueroa
Music 105

The song “Hotter Than that” by Louis Armstrong and His Hot five is just amazing. Hotter Than That has to be my favorite song that has been introduced to me in this class by far. It has an amazing beat that is real catchy. The beat reminds me of my childhood days of watching Disney’s Jungle Book. The Horn really stands out throughout the song.

The beginning started with what seems as two 55 sec. solos. The solos were quite wonderful and the change of pitch between both solos was also interesting to me. The solos were followed for what seemed to be gibberish, but really accompanied the song well. Again the gibberish reminds me of the Jungle Book. The little solos that followed were also well placed. The solos integrated themselves well with the ensemble that was to follow. The piece overall was well planned out and everything came together in the end.

Marco F. said...

The song “Hotter Than that” by Louis Armstrong and His Hot five is just amazing. Hotter Than That has to be my favorite song that has been introduced to me in this class by far. It has an amazing beat that is real catchy. The beat reminds me of my childhood days of watching Disney’s Jungle Book. The Horn really stands out throughout the song.

The beginning started with what seems as two 55 sec. solos. The solos were quite wonderful and the change of pitch between both solos was also interesting to me. The solos were followed for what seemed to be gibberish, but really accompanied the song well. Again the gibberish reminds me of the Jungle Book. The little solos that followed were also well placed. The solos integrated themselves well with the ensemble that was to follow. The piece overall was well planned out and everything came together in the end.

rihe91 said...

Eli Rios
Music 105
Furlough Assignment

Louis Armstrong's first recordings with the Hot Fives started in 1925. One of his popular songs "HOtter Than That" was recorded in 1927. The intro of "Hotter Than That" introduces the whole band. Jonny Dodds then takes over with his clarinet solo(first solo of the song) for about a minute.The melody of the song is played by the banjo.

At almost a minute and a half into the song, Armstron(second solo)starts scat singing for about a minute. The melody is still played with the banjo. The rest of the band follows Armstrong in the last minute of the song.

mtakhar said...

Manjit Takhar
Music 105
Furlough Assignment

Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five record “Hotter Than That” in Chicago of 1927. Louis Armstrong is a virtuoso cornet player. He was the leader of His Hot Five and without him his band wouldn’t have been as successful. Armstrong had the ability to improvise. Even if he did make a mistake while playing, he made it work. “Hotter Than Hot” starts off with the whole band playing a melody.

After ten seconds into the song, Armstrong does a cornet solo. His wife Lil Armstrong helps on the piano during his cornet solo. At the 1:20 mark, Armstrong begins to scat while his band plays which results as collective improvisation. Armstrong then does a call and response with the banjo. At the 2:18 mark his band then starts playing after his call and response with the banjo. The song finishes with the banjo and cornet playing.

Marco F. said...

Marco Figueroa
Music 105
Furlough Assignment

The song “Hotter Than that” by Louis Armstrong and His Hot five is just amazing. Hotter Than That has to be my favorite song that has been introduced to me in this class by far. It has an amazing beat that is real catchy. The beat reminds me of my childhood days of watching Disney’s Jungle Book. The Horn really stands out throughout the song.

The beginning started with what seems as two 55 sec. solos. The solos were quite wonderful and the change of pitch between both solos was also interesting to me. The solos were followed for what seemed to be gibberish, but really accompanied the song well. Again the gibberish reminds me of the Jungle Book. The little solos that followed were also well placed. The solos integrated themselves well with the ensemble that was to follow. The piece overall was well planned out and everything came together in the end.

Daisy Solis said...

n Hotter than That, Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five start with Armstrong's cornet being the tune that stands out from the rest making it syncopated. During the beginning The piano in the background played by Lil, separate notes going in a fast tempo but not as good as Armstrong's cornet. At one minute and nineteen Armstrong's scat singing solo, improvised and goes together very well with the banjo. At two minutes Armstrong and the banjo player have a few seconds of call and respond scat singing and banjo playing. The call and respond is followed by a player mixed in during a short second at two minutes and five seconds. The short second of mixed in note make the call and respond very interesting.

After the scat and banjo call and response the piano has a small solo and after the all players come back in with some of the song and pauses. With emphasis on the cornet for the rest of the song which is improvised. The small banjo and cornet solo toward the end was syncopated. With a small call and respond from the banjo and the corent at the end; it gave the song a good ending.

osorot said...

The band plays together at the beginning and Armstrong starts with a solo. The band plays in the background. Armstrong sings his parts and the band accompanies his in the background. He plays in a call and response with a guitar.

"Hotter than that" starts with ("A") for about 17 bars of the band playing together. Trumpet with the lead and the band going along with him. The next 17 bars the clarinet takes the lead ("B"). Armstrong takes a vocal solo for about 17 bars ("A") with no accompaniment then ("B") there is a call and response for 8 bars between the trumpet and a guitar. The ("A") starts with an intro for about 2 measures going into a trombone solo and accompaniment from the band for 8 measures. Then ("B"), a solo and band accompaniment with a trumpet for 9 measures. It ends with ("A") for 4 measures with a call and response from a guitar and trumpet.
Posted by osorot at 6:55 PM

Gary Patterson said...

Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five’s Hotter Than That begins with Louis’ cornet reigning supreme, much more audible and clear and projected than the accompaniment provided by his front line. In this jam,consisting of Kid Orry’s trombone, Johnny Dodd’s clarinet, and of course his wife Lil Armstrong supplying some chordal back-up on piano, his sound is so dominant that it almost sounds as if it is a solo. His cornet also gives off a feeling that it is talking, as though he is at the beginning of an exciting story. At :45, and I am no expert at all, but this sounds as though it might be Dodd’s clarinet taking off, giving a little feedback to Armstrong’s story in sound. Armstrong responds with some classic scat from 1:20 until 1:50, with what sounds to me like a banjo just barely whispering in the back, and at that point, he breaks into a call and response with Johnson’s guitar until 2:15, where we have his wife’s piano bring us (and the rest of the band) back on board for the final conversation between Armstrong’s cornet and Lonnie Johnson’s guitar.

Gary Patterson said...

Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five’s Hotter Than That begins with Louis’ cornet reigning supreme, much more audible and clear and projected than the accompaniment provided by his front line. In this jam,consisting of Kid Orry’s trombone, Johnny Dodd’s clarinet, and of course his wife Lil Armstrong supplying some chordal back-up on piano, his sound is so dominant that it almost sounds as if it is a solo. His cornet also gives off a feeling that it is talking, as though he is at the beginning of an exciting story. At :45, and I am no expert at all, but this sounds as though it might be Dodd’s clarinet taking off, giving a little feedback to Armstrong’s story in sound. Armstrong responds with some classic scat from 1:20 until 1:50, with what sounds to me like a banjo just barely whispering in the back, and at that point, he breaks into a call and response with Johnson’s guitar until 2:15, where we have his wife’s piano bring us (and the rest of the band) back on board for the final conversation between Armstrong’s cornet and Lonnie Johnson’s guitar.